Credibility in Employee Training

Employees have the tendency to listen to a trainer that they perceive to be the expert.

Think about the following scenario. Mike is a knowledgeable and dynamic teacher. His classes are known for having the best student retention rates on campus. Management considers Mike as an “instructional delivery expert.”  The campus president asks Mike to teach instructional skills to other instructors at her campus. Most of the instructors have more field experience than Mike and many consider themselves as the expert in virtue of their knowledge of the subject matter. They see Mike as a teacher who simply passes every student in the class because he does not know the subject matter very well! Would the instructors listen and learn from Mike? Maybe not. Subject matter experts are more inclined to learn teaching strategies and techniques from independent instructional delivery experts who have positioned themselves as specialists in training of trainers.

Perception is reality! Don’t underestimate the importance of perception if you want to get results from your training programs. After all, results are what matter.
 

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Johanne
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“Don’t underestimate the importance of perception if you want to get results from your training programs”

– I agree. The audience must perceive you as someone with authority before they can believe you.