AT&T Provides $1.6 Million AccessAll Grant to Help African Americans Prepare for Careers in Technology

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The AT&T Foundation, the philanthropic arm of AT&T Inc., recently announced a $1.6 million AT&T AccessAll grant to the National Urban League to support opportunities for technology-career development for African Americans.

The AT&T Foundation grant will launch five new Digital Career Academies, as well as expand offerings at 11 existing academies located across the country. The grant is part of the three-year $100 million AT&T AccessAll initiative to provide technology access to underserved communities.

"Many of the fastest-growing careers in America require computer skills and focus on the technology industry," said National Urban League President and CEO Marc H. Morial. "These Digital Career Academies will help us ensure that African Americans are prepared to compete successfully in today's technology-driven job market."

The Digital Career Academies program builds on the success of a 2004
AT&T Foundation grant initiative, which provided $1,070,000 to the National Urban League to launch the initial 11 technology career academies. Through the program, the National Urban League provided information-technology career training in computer and video-game programming, 3-D animation, digital radio and IT administration.

Under the 2006 grant, the 11 existing Digital Career Academies will continue to provide instruction in digital media and IT administration. The five new academy sites, which will be selected based on a competitive process open to National Urban League affiliates, will focus on video-game programming and IT administration career development. In addition, all 16 project sites will provide service offerings to include basic and intermediate technology-skills training, career counseling, internship and job placement support.

"In recent years, we have seen the job market demand a workforce that is increasingly technology-focused," said Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas. "Many jobs in technology offer individuals greater career opportunities and earning potential. The National Urban League's Digital Career Academies program will help more African Americans find and secure technology opportunities."

The 11 existing Digital Career Academies expanding their technology training programs under the AT&T Foundation grant include:

  • Los Angeles Urban League
  • Greater Sacramento Urban League, in California
  • Urban League of Greater Hartford Inc., in Connecticut
  • Urban League of Champaign County, in Illinois
  • Urban League of Madison County Inc., in Indiana
  • Grand Rapids Urban League, in Michigan
  • Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis Inc.
  • Akron Community Service Center and Urban League, in Ohio
  • Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City Inc.
  • Urban League of Greater Dallas and North Central Texas
  • Urban League of Racine and Kenosha Inc., in Wisconsin

The AT&T Foundation supports nonprofit organizations and projects that increase inclusion and create opportunities for diverse populations. In 2005, AT&T and the AT&T Foundation contributed more than $21 million and supported nearly 800 organizations and programs that enrich and strengthen diverse communities nationwide.

Good question. One great

Good question. One great place to look for training would be a career training site like Career Explorer or Search4CareerColleges. They can help you find a school in your area or an online option. Another great thing about the colleges listed, is the fact that the admissions representatives are very helpful with financial aid and grants. Once you find a school that looks right for you, you can set up an appointment and they will walk you through the process. Good luck, it sounds like you have a great start.

I am thinking would like to

I am thinking would like to go back to collge and get my degree in information technology. I work with computers everyday. I have started a computer club for children through my job. I know a lot about computers and I know how to use all the applications well, but I don't have a degree and I do not have the funds to cover the cost of what it cost to go to a college or university. Some of my employees told me about grant programs that will help with the funding; therefore I woul like to know more about how this program works. If you could please e-mail me with some information I would appreiciate it.

Thank,
Donna Swanson